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Wildcat Community

Our Episcopal Identity

School Worship

Creative, inclusive, and drawing fully upon the liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church, worship is a regular part of school life for all faculty and students.

Community Life

Reflection, prayer, and matters of the spirit are honored and cultivated and the physical, mental, and emotional health of all are supported and nurtured.

Religious Study

Meaningful, academically substantive, and age-appropriate; and in teaching the Christian tradition, fosters dialogue with other faith traditions.

Social Justice

Equity, justice, and a just society throughout the life of the school; the embracing and honoring of diversity; and the inclusion of community service and service learning into the life of the school.

Signature Programs

Wildcat Community

Events

Upper School (9-12)

Upper School students are curious and disciplined. At this level, teachers challenge them to reach beyond their intellectual comfort zone.

They’re ready to stretch their abilities, take risks, and explore different perspectives. Motivated and ambitious, they learn to study and research independently, to communicate ideas in a meaningful way, and to develop the social and interpersonal skills of cooperation, teamwork, and leadership. And because they’re ready, we give them the space to think independently, critically and creatively. With this blend of freedom and responsibility, Upper School students thrive.

The teachers push you hard, but they make sure you get it. They want you to succeed - 11th grade student

Viewbook

Course of Study

Upper School News

2017 Class Day Honors

"I know that they have adults in their lives, on this campus, who have shifted their paths and helped them make the most of their natural abilities. That is the beauty of schools like ours and those stories are a source of tremendous pride for all of us," Class Day Address by Dr. David Perkinson, Head of School.


Don't Limit Yourself Only to "Up"

As Episcopal marked the transition of students to higher grade levels, Father Leacock calls on students not to think of it as only moving up, but also inward, within, and outward. "Our movement ought not be a narrow climb, but an expansive movement to be in the world, to see and know and understand who our neighbors are beyond the boundaries of this campus, and to understand where our greatest passions and the world's deepest needs meet."

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